Bonsai and direct sunlight don’t go together in the high desert.

Good morning guys,

With all success and we love to talk about those and we also have failures and we don’t like to talk about those much, but here I go; today the root system on one of our coveted young Cape Honeysuckle possibly overheated, killing the root system, had nothing to do with moisture in the soil, wait had all to do with moisture in the root system. Let me explain: so the purpose of having a special bonsai soil is to retain some moisture yet also oxygen, keeping a balance for the root system to breath and drink, helping keep healthy specimen. But when your outdoor temp hits the hundreds the sun can turn your bonsai pot, specially the smaller pot into an instant oven. So how do we keep sun balance you ask?. Some people build expensive and elaborate 50% shade canopy cover systems to protect the bonsai nurseries from direct sun by allowing a 50% shade in intervals as the sun passes over.

Wait a minute everyone said to “leave it in the sun”, So we need to keep the Bonsai in the Sun. but we can’t keep the Bonsai the sun because the pot will get hot so how do we resolve this issue if i can build something like a bonsai nursery or special shading system?

My solution regarding outdoor bonsai in high desert location.  We all know our bonsai need sun, but what happen when the sun is direct and does not take long before it heats up everything to over 105 degrees °F or 40 °C and that will start cooking the root system on 90 percent of plants and trees. Specially if using a more organic soil system.

I have found something that has worked for me, will assist in keeping the direct sun off the pot and soil, basically what I’ve done is make a small canopy with a flat rate bubble white envelope from the US postal service. this help keep direct sun off the pot and top soil, preventing the root system from ever reaching dangerous temperature for your specimen. hope this helps keep your bonsai or plants cool in the summer heat. 

Caring for a Rosemary Bonsai

Rosemary Bonsai needs just a little more special care.

Your garden is part of your own personality and this is why; it is important to have a good herb garden design. Most bonsai lovers prefer Rosemary Bonsai tree in their garden. It is evergreen, semi-woody, grows rapidly and can tolerate short period of drought. Rosemary also has medicinal properties and helps in preventing and treat cancer, liver diseases, and asthma. Its lavender blue flowers have sweet fragrance. Rosemary is pest resistant. All these and many more qualities make it an integral part of every herb garden design. The various cultivable varieties of Rosemary bonsai are Blue Lady, Blue Spires, Golden Rain, Miss Jessup and Severn Sea.  While planting it there are many things that one should remember.

Planting Location-Sun Or Shade

Place the Rosemary bonsai at a location which receives six to eight hours of sunlight. It grows well in a warm and well ventilated location. But one should avoid placing their rosemary bonsai near heating stoves, direct heat and locations with high temperatures. The high temperatures can damage it and retard its growth. It is advisable to keep your bonsai indoors during winter.

Watering

It is advisable to water Rosemary bonsai regularly, although it is slightly drought resistant. It is preferable to water it in the morning. Mostly it requires water every two to three days. Check the soil moisture level with your finger before watering it.

Rosemary Bonsai
Bonsai & Teacups Rosemary Bonsai specimen.

 Always ensure that the potting container drains well as it cannot tolerate wet roots. Leaves of this bonsai have a benefit of absorbing water. So, misting water and fertilizers regularly on leaves helps in maintaining a healthy plant.

Regular Pruning And Re-potting

Rosemary bonsai requires regular pruning to control its shape and maintain its health. It is advisable to remove dry and dead branches in early spring. Trim the bonsai at regular intervals during growing season. The branches on inner side may become dense with time. Trim them to facilitate the easy circulation of air and easy penetration of light. It will promote healthy growth of your bonsai. The young rosemary bonsai requires annual re-potting while it is seen that mature rosemary requires re-potting every second or third year. While re-potting rosemary bonsai, its roots are pruned about one third inch. Avoid excess pruning as it can damage the plant. Remove excess soil and re-pot it quickly to avoid drying of the roots. After re-potting carefully water the plant.

Feeding And Caring For Your Rosemary Bonsai

The rosemary bonsai should be fertilized every six weeks between spring and mid-summer with a well balanced fertilizer. A well balanced fertilizer includes proportionate amount of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous. It is better to incorporate the fertilizer in half strength. The fertilizer should not be placed near the roots as it may burn them. Rosemary is susceptible to powdery mildew fungus, so it is advisable to spray sulfur containing fungicide once a month to have prosperous Rosemary Bonsai in your herb garden or bonsai garden design.

My Saturday

So Marilynn my beautiful wife is doing garage sale, so took the time to show some of my bonsai today. 

Even sold one this morning. Thank you Sandy From Henderson, Nevada. So we have open our Home for friends and the curious of the art of bonsai, to  join us for a cup of coffee and talk stories.

S

“Share your love and passion of your gift and talents with the world, it makes it a better place.” — Efrain Gonzalez.

Early Spring Tips: Patience and Perseverance

How Should You Prepare For Spring?

This time of year is fraught with danger for your bonsai trees. The deadliest of these dangers is impatience. Your bonsai has, thanks to your diligent care and attention, enjoyed a much needed rest over the winter and will soon be ready to reward you with a burst of spectacular spring growth.

What Should You Do For Outdoor Bonsai?

If you have potted outdoor bonsai in storage, be patient and keep it there until the weather is warmer. On those occasionally warm days, you should go out and check your bonsai to see if they are either dry or wet. If they are dry, go ahead and water; if they are wet, go ahead and put them on their side to aid drainage.

It is OK to open the doors on cold frames on warm days, but be absolutely sure to remember to close them at night. This will help keep the temperature more even and prevent the possibility of premature leafing.

Patience and perseverance: Remember, temperatures at this time of year fluctuate – a lot; during the day the wind can be strong and drying, and a frost at night is entirely possible and possibly deadly – both boundaries can cause irreparable damage to your bonsai.

So, please, for the sake and safety of your beloved bonsai tree, do not take them out during the day and then move them back in at night – Patience and Perseverance – it is far wiser to keep them in one place, a safe place – their winter storage; until all signs of frost have past.

What Should You Do For Indoor Bonsai? – If you have indoor bonsai it is imperative to remember that the dark and dreary days of winter have created all of the right conditions for: root rot, leaf drop and fungal concerns that can all wreak eternal havoc upon your bonsai.

The blissful nirvana that you created in your home for your bonsai trees to happily spend the winter in has, because of the lingering weakness of the sun’s rays, in many cases, left them starving for light. This hunger can be evidenced by leaf drop, persistently wet soil and an overall yellowish and unhealthy appearance. If this is happening to your indoor bonsai, once again, it is crucial to be patient!

Cutting back on the amount and frequency of watering is important and to get your trees as much sunlight or artificial light, such as florescent light, as possible.

When a bonsai looses its leaves, it looses its ability to transpire, which in turn prevents the roots from being able to absorb water, which in turn creates soggy soil conditions, which in turn leads to root rot, which, if not properly addressed with – patience and perseverance – will lead to the untimely demise of your beloved indoor bonsai.

So, at this time of year it is very important to remember to give your bonsai more light, keep the soil on the dry side (if the aforementioned conditions exist), and wait for the warmer and brighter days of spring to start applying small amounts of fertilizer – Not to fear, they soon will be here!

         

Why the cape honeysuckle as bonsai?

bonsaiteacups.ef.04242017.888881.003

The name cape honeysuckle came about because the native region for this shrub is in South Africa by the Cape of Good Hope. This is so misleading to me, as this is not a true honeysuckle. Real honeysuckles belong to the Caprifoliaceae family and are found in the Lonicera genus. The one thing I truly love about this specimen is, the trumpet-shaped flowers come in a blazing bright orange, that is sure to brighten up your tropical or bonsai garden. i’m found of this specie as a bonsai as it allows me to work on the as they are fast growing allowing me to work on my pruning and trimming skill and the tree is somewhat forgiving, and after the roots establish she is very tolerant to watering mistakes. this is why to me it’s a good starter tree. it’s also found easily at your neighborhood plant and tree nursery.

Latin Name:

This plant is classified as Tecomaria capensis and belongs to the Bignoniaceae family. Other members include the desert willow, northern and southern catalpa, and jacaranda. Synonyms include Tecoma capensis and Bignonia capensis.

 

Preferred USDA Hardiness Zones:

For optimal results, this should be planted in USDA zones 9-11. It can possibly survive in zone 8 with some protection.

Size & Shape:

The shape depends entirely on how you let it grow, as it can either be a shrub,vine or small tree.

As a shrub and small tree, it can be anywhere from 3-10′ tall, depending on how consistently you prune it. In vine form it will travel a lot farther, reaching lengths of 25-30′ or more.

This is why I like to work with the specie of tree, as it allows me to work constantly in shaping and pruning.

Exposure:

Some light shade is acceptable, but this tropical specie does prefer full sun.

Foliage/Flowers/Fruit:

Each pinnately compound leaf is made up of 5-9 leaflets that are shaped like diamonds.

Whether they are evergreen or deciduous depends on how cool the climate gets in winter.

During the fall through spring (possibly the entire year), the cape honeysuckle will be covered with an abundance of orange (sometimes reddish or yellow, depending on variety) blooms in the shape of a trumpet.

Once the flowers have been pollinated, long capsule fruits are produced.

Design Tips:

Serenity

I usually see the cape honeysuckle used as vine, treated as a shrub can be clipped into a shapes. However, this tree also does well as a bonsai specimen,  and with proper trimming you can enjoy a very beautiful conversation piece, so consider it as a starter specimen.

If you want to bring hummingbirds to your yard, you simply must have one of these as a bonsai specimen! They’ll be visiting your yard in no time, especially if you’ve also planted some trees that attract hummingbirds.

Growing Tips:

Don’t fret about the pH of your soil too much, as this plant can handle both acidic and alkaline soils. It also grows in salty locations like coastal regions and can handle gusts of wind very well. The one thing we have learned about trees that handle wind well, is that smaller bonsai pot don’t. Got home one windy day and found 2 of my bonsai on the floor as the pot really did not weight much. After a year or so of regular watering, the roots should be established enough to provide drought tolerance making this specimen a very hardy bonsai.

If you’ve tested the soil and detected a lack of nutrients, go ahead and use some light fertilizer. It is usually not needed, if proper bonsai maintenance is done.

Maintenance/Pruning:

Pruning depends on the shape you’ve chosen.

If you’re going for a bonsai, trimming may be required on a regular basis since this grows fast. You should also prune away branches that were damaged by frost at the start of spring. This plant does produce suckers. Clip them away if you don’t want them to spread.

As this is a fast growing tree, that also means that for the life of this specimen as a bonsai it will be a very interactive bonsai, during most of the year.

 

Pests & Diseases of Cape Honeysuckle:

There really aren’t many problems with this plant. If your zone gets some frost, this can cause damage to the leaves and branches. You may run across problems with too little or too many nutrients, which is usually most apparent in the foliage. There may be other environmental problems like leaf scorch.

Overall, though, this shrub should stay happy and healthy over its lifetime with little maintenance.

if you have any question please ask:

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Why the cape honeysuckle as bonsai?

bonsaiteacups.ef.04242017.888881.003
“Genesis” Cape Honeysuckle bonsai specimen

The name cape honeysuckle came about because the native region for this shrub is in South Africa by the Cape of Good Hope. This is so misleading to me, as this is not a true honeysuckle. Real honeysuckles belong to the Caprifoliaceae family and are found in the Lonicera genus. The one thing I truly love about this specimen is, the trumpet-shaped flowers come in a blazing bright orange, that is sure to brighten up your tropical or bonsai garden. i’m found of this specie as a bonsai as it allows me to work on the as they are fast growing allowing me to work on my pruning and trimming skill and the tree is somewhat forgiving, and after the roots establish she is very tolerant to watering mistakes. this is why to me it’s a good starter tree. it’s also found easily at your neighborhood plant and tree nursery.

Latin Name:

This plant is classified as Tecomaria capensis and belongs to the Bignoniaceae family. Other members include the desert willow, northern and southern catalpa, and jacaranda. Synonyms include Tecoma capensis and Bignonia capensis.

 

Preferred USDA Hardiness Zones:

For optimal results, this should be planted in USDA zones 9-11. It can possibly survive in zone 8 with some protection.

Size & Shape:

The shape depends entirely on how you let it grow, as it can either be a shrub,vine or small tree.

As a shrub and small tree, it can be anywhere from 3-10′ tall, depending on how consistently you prune it. In vine form it will travel a lot farther, reaching lengths of 25-30′ or more.

This is why I like to work with the specie of tree, as it allows me to work constantly in shaping and pruning.

Exposure:

Some light shade is acceptable, but this tropical specie does prefer full sun.

Foliage/Flowers/Fruit:

Each pinnately compound leaf is made up of 5-9 leaflets that are shaped like diamonds.

Whether they are evergreen or deciduous depends on how cool the climate gets in winter.

During the fall through spring (possibly the entire year), the cape honeysuckle will be covered with an abundance of orange (sometimes reddish or yellow, depending on variety) blooms in the shape of a trumpet.

Once the flowers have been pollinated, long capsule fruits are produced.

Design Tips:

Serenity
“Serenity”Cape Honeysuckle(Tecoma Capesis) oval terrecatta 14″ 9″ 3” Yixing pot

I usually see the cape honeysuckle used as vine, treated as a shrub can be clipped into a shapes. However, this tree also does well as a bonsai specimen,  and with proper trimming you can enjoy a very beautiful conversation piece, so consider it as a starter specimen.

If you want to bring hummingbirds to your yard, you simply must have one of these as a bonsai specimen! They’ll be visiting your yard in no time, especially if you’ve also planted some trees that attract hummingbirds.

Growing Tips:

Don’t fret about the pH of your soil too much, as this plant can handle both acidic and alkaline soils. It also grows in salty locations like coastal regions and can handle gusts of wind very well. The one thing we have learned about trees that handle wind well, is that smaller bonsai pot don’t. Got home one windy day and found 2 of my bonsai on the floor as the pot really did not weight much. After a year or so of regular watering, the roots should be established enough to provide drought tolerance making this specimen a very hardy bonsai.

If you’ve tested the soil and detected a lack of nutrients, go ahead and use some light fertilizer. It is usually not needed, if proper bonsai maintenance is done.

Maintenance/Pruning:

Pruning depends on the shape you’ve chosen.

If you’re going for a bonsai, trimming may be required on a regular basis since this grows fast. You should also prune away branches that were damaged by frost at the start of spring. This plant does produce suckers. Clip them away if you don’t want them to spread.

As this is a fast growing tree, that also means that for the life of this specimen as a bonsai it will be a very interactive bonsai, during most of the year.

 

Pests & Diseases of Cape Honeysuckle:

There really aren’t many problems with this plant. If your zone gets some frost, this can cause damage to the leaves and branches. You may run across problems with too little or too many nutrients, which is usually most apparent in the foliage. There may be other environmental problems like leaf scorch.

Overall, though, this shrub should stay happy and healthy over its lifetime with little maintenance.

if you have any question please ask:

Bok Tower and Gardens


Bok Tower Gardens (also known as Bok Mountain Lake Sanctuary and Singing Tower) is a National Historic Landmark, contemplative garden, and bird sanctuary located north of Lake Wales, Florida, United States. It consists of a 250-acre (100 ha) garden, the 205-foot (62 m) tall Singing Tower with its carillon bells, Pine Ridge Trail, Pinewood Estate, and a visitor center. The tower is built upon Iron Mountain, one of the highest points of peninsular Florida, estimated to be 295 feet (90 m) above sea level.[4] It is a National Historic Landmark that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Bok Tower Gardens is open daily, and an admission fee of 14.00 dollars.